Our Impact

dawned.jpgBreaking the Uncomfortable Silence

Dawn and Ed Novak’s daughter was in a violent relationship. Many saw the signs – no one spoke up. Natalie, a 20-year-old university student, was murdered by her ex-boyfriend. The Novaks are breaking the silence surrounding domestic violence. And an interdisciplinary team of researchers at Western is using education to prevent this violence from happening to others.

Sonia and Maha El-BiraniFatal Silence

The Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Conference is the backdrop for this insightful documentary that focuses on Sonia El-Birani who was murdered by her husband in 2012. Her daughter, Maha El-Biranı speaks publicly of the traumatic events and through behind the scenes conversations and self reflections uncovers the risk factors and potential actions that may have prevented her mother’s death.

 

Cornwall Inquiry Report CoverCornwall Public Inquiry

The Cornwall Public Inquiry was established in 2006 to review allegations of historical abuse of young people in Cornwall, and to examine how the justice system and institutions in Cornwall responded. The Report of the Cornwall Inquiry was released on December 15, 2009.







Heritage plaqueHeritage Plaque

Western honours groundbreaking research on violence against women and children Western University has recognized The Centre for Research & Education on Violence Against Women & Children (CREVAWC) for its groundbreaking research and 25-year partnership with the community. The plaque, which is voted on by the Western community, celebrates significant research-related moments in the university’s history, and encourages the campus community and its visitors to learn how these contributions have benefited the social, financial, cultural and medical well-being of citizens in Canada and abroad.


 

Knowledge mobilization for 2017-2018

 

Our Research

  • The centre was among the first to conduct research on children's exposure to domestic violence and recognizing this experience as a form of emotional and psychological harm. Policy and legal implications include recognizing this risk in children protection and child custody laws, and developing specialized treatment programs for children exposed to this violence.
  • Canadian Domestic Homicide Prevention Initiative is the first of its kind in the country working on the creation of a national database of domestic homicides.
  • The centre coordinated the first national Canadian study on the impacts of domestic violence on workers and the workplace (2014).
  • The centre conducted a survey of 500 perpetrators of domestic violence. Respondents came from all parts of the province and represented all service regions. The survey found that perpetration of domestic violence is associated with substantial negative effects on the productivity and safety of workers with close to half of respondents (46%) reporting that violence issues negatively affected their job performance.

Policy & Legislation

  • The centre was involved in changing the Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act in 2010 through Bill 168, which introduced new responsibilities for employers to prevent and respond to violence, harassment and domestic violence in the workplace.
  • The centre was involved in changing the Ontario Employment Standards Act in 2017 to include Domestic or sexual violence leave as a job-protected leave of absence. It provides up to 10 days and 15 weeks in a calendar year of time off to be taken for specific purposes when an employee or an employee’s child has experienced or been threatened with domestic or sexual violence.
  • The centre coordinated the first national Canadian study on the impacts of domestic violence on workers and the workplace (2014). This study provided evidence that has led to legislative changes in labour employment standards federally and in several provinces.
    • To date, the following changes have been implemented:
      • Bill C-63 changes the Canada Labour Code to allow for 10 days of unpaid leave for federally regulated employees who are victims of family violence.
      • Bill 8 changed the Employment Standards Code in Manitoba to allow for five days of paid leave and up to 52 weeks of unpaid leave for victims of domestic violence who are employed in Manitoba.
      • The Fair and Family-Friendly Workplaces Act in Alberta changes the Employment Standards Code to allow for up to 10 days unpaid leave for employees who experience domestic violence.
      • Bill 604, An Act to Provide Support for Victims of Domestic Violence provides employees in Saskatchewan who experience domestic violence with up to 10 days unpaid leave.
      • Bill 26 made changes to the Employment Standards Act in Ontario that will allow employees to take a job-protected leave of five paid days, and an additional five unpaid days, if they or their children have experienced domestic or sexual violence.
      • Employment Standards (Domestic Violence Leave) Amendment Act, 2017, proposes amendments to the British Columbia Employment Standards Act, which would provide up to 10 days of paid leave, and up to 17 weeks of unpaid leave, if the employee or the employee’s child has experienced domestic violence or sexual violence.
      • On January 22, 2018, the Government of New Brunswick announced its intention to propose amendments to the Employment Standards Act that would allow for domestic or intimate partner violence leave.

Advocacy

  • The centre was involved in advocating for change to the Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act in 2010 through Bill 168, which introduced new responsibilities for employers to prevent and respond to violence, harassment and domestic violence in the workplace.
  • The centre was involved in advocating for change to the Ontario Employment Standards Act in 2017 to include Domestic or sexual violence leave as a job-protected leave of absence. It provides up to 10 days and 15 weeks in a calendar year of time off to be taken for specific purposes when an employee or an employee’s child has experienced or been threatened with domestic or sexual violence.